Los Angeles Will Be a “No-Kill Shelter” City by End of 2017

With five little words, “Now, therefore be it resolved”, the City of Los Angeles reconfirmed its commitment to achieving a no-kill resolution that by December 31, 2017 will see every healthy and adoptable dog and cat in L.A. Animal Services, protected from arbitrary euthanasia.

Los Angeles city council unanimously took the stance to approve the no-kill resolution, making it the largest city in the U.S. to do so and bringing to close five years of gritty determination on the part of Best Friends Animal Society to never stop fighting for the animals. The animal rescue and advocacy organization promotes spay neuter, TNR (trap neuter return), pet adoption, and no-kill programs nation-wide and considers this win just the start. The group’s ultimate goal is for America to be a no-kill nation by 2025 and with the help of No Kill Los Angeles (NKLA) and the support of L.A. Councilman Paul Koretz, this win becomes a pretty significant step forward.

Related: What is a No Kill Shelter?

To be clear, resolutions aren’t laws, but are a non-binding way for government bodies to proclaim a stance on a particular issue. A no-kill resolution makes the proclamation that elected officials want to see local municipal agencies and general managers work toward ending killing in shelters.

In this instance, L.A. council wants their animal services department to work in collaboration with NKLA, other rescuers and rescue organizations, humane organizations and the general public to develop a comprehensive strategy to reach and maintain a life-saving rate consistent with accepted no-kill standards.

While it sounds like a lot of political-speak, it really is a good thing and Best Friends is encouraging all communities to pursue similar resolutions in a bid to get the grass roots growing for this no-kill movement.

Best Friend’s equates this goal to former President Kennedy’s lofty national challenge to reach the moon back in the ’60s. Almost unthinkable yet ultimately achievable. Perhaps by 2025 the famous “one small step for man” will become “one long life for a dog”.


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