Aidi

 
  • Lifespan: 12-13 years
  • Group: not applicable
  • Best Suited For: Families with children, houses with yards, watchdog, rural homes
  • Temperament: Energetic, protective, agile, alert

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If you were to picture a medium-sized dog with a thick coat that bears some resemblance to a sheepdog, you could be thinking of the Aidi. The Aidi is also known as the Chien de l’Atlas and it is an African breed that was developed in Morocco. This breed was not common until the 1960s and it still has not been recognized by the AKC. Though this breed was developed for livestock guardianship, the modern Aidi is more commonly kept for companionship. If you are looking for a medium-sized active breed, the Aidi may be a good option for you.

Though this breed was developed for livestock guardianship, the modern Aidi is more commonly kept for companionship.

The origins of the Aidi breed can be traced back to North Africa and it probably originated in the Sahara region. This breed was developed to work in the Atlas Mountains of Libya, Morocco, and Algeria where it worked to protect its handlers from predators. The Aidi is also known as the Berber and it has been called a number of other names including the Chien de l’Atlas – it was even mistakenly named the Atlast Sheepdog when the first breed standard was published in 1963, even though the breed never served as a sheepdog. This mistake was corrected in 1969. Though originally bred as a hunter and protector, more recently the Aidi has become known as a house dog and it does particularly well as an urban pet when given enough exercise.

The Aidi's coat is heavy and soft – surprising for an African dog breed.The Aidi is a Moroccan breed that was developed as a livestock guardian in the Atlas Mountains. This breed looks similar to the Pariah Dog, though it is unknown whether these two breeds share any ancestry.

The Aidi is a medium-sized breed and should be offered a food formulated for dogs of its size. Because this dog is also a very active breed you may want to consider switching to an active breed formula to ensure that your dog’s daily energy needs are met.

The Aidi breed is smart and thus responds well to training.

The Aidi breed is smart and thus responds well to training. This breed can be a little sensitive, however, so you should never use punishment as a training tool – only use positive reinforcement-based training methods. This dog was developed to guard people and livestock, so it can be a little bit independent at time. For this reason it is recommended that you maintain a firm and consistent hand in training. As with all dogs, you should begin your Aidi with training and socialization as early as possible to prevent the development of problem behaviors.

The Aidi breed typically stands between 20 and 24 inches tall and weighs up to 55 pounds.

Aidi Or Atlas Mountain DogThe Aidi dog is agile and alert which stands to reason with its history as a livestock guardian. This dog has strong protective instincts and may be a little wary around strangers. To make sure that this breed gets along with other dogs and people you should start socialization and training as early as possible. This breed does particularly well as a watch dog but it also does well as a family pet. When raised properly this breed can be very affectionate and loyal with family.

For the most part, the Aidi breed is very healthy and not prone to developing serious health problems. As is true with all dogs, however, this breed may be prone to developing certain conditions like hip dysplasia, eye problems, and elbow dysplasia.

The average lifespan for the Aidi bred is about 12 years.

The Aidi does well in urban settings as long as it is given adequate daily exercise. This breed is fairly active and requires a long daily walk – it would also appreciate some active playtime and free time in a large, fenced yard if possible. Making sure this breed gets enough mental and physical stimulation is the key to preventing the development of problem behaviors.

The Aidi dog is agile and alert which stands to reason with its history as a livestock guardian.

The Aidi is not currently recognized by the AKC but it is recognized by the United Kennel Club, the Dog Registry of America, Inc., and the American Canine Association. It is also recognized by the FCI.

The Aidi breed has a coarse, weather-resistant coat of medium length. This dog’s coat is surprisingly thick for it being a breed of African descent. The Aidi comes in a variety of colors including black, white, red, and tawny – the nose color typically matches the coat.

The average litter size for the Aidi breed is 5 to 8 puppies, but they are capable of having very large litters up to 12 or more. As with all dogs, you should begin your Aidi puppy with training and socialization as early as possible to prevent the development of problem behaviors.

Photo credit: eriklam/Bigstock


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