Facts And Myths About Dog Insurance Policies

Everyone seems to have something to say on the topic of dog insurance. Of course, they’re only trying to be helpful, but just because your cousin’s friend’s sister’s mailman had a problem claiming with a specific insurer, it doesn’t mean that’s necessarily the gospel truth. It can be hard to figure out what’s true and what’s not when it comes to pet insurance, but if you take a look at these myths and facts, you’ll soon have a better understanding between fact and fiction.

FACT: You Can Choose Your Own Vet. Unlike health insurance for humans, where you have to choose from an approved list of doctors who will accept your type of policy, all vets will accept all kinds of pet insurance policy. This means, you can stick with your trusted veterinarian and won’t have to switch just to fit in with your insurer.

Related: Making A Dog Insurance Claim

FACT: Pet Insurance Can Be Reasonably Priced. While lifetime policies can have high premiums, there are a range of more affordable dog insurance options for those who have a lower budget. That said, even the most the most expensive of policies could work out saving you tens of thousands of dollars, if your pooch suffers from a serious illness or injury. So, when you look at it that way, it doesn’t seem too expensive.

FACT: Pet Insurance Policies Are Easy to Set Up. Getting your dog insured doesn’t have to be a hassle. Most insurance companies even allow you to set up your new policy online. As long as you have basic details about your pooch, such as his breed and age, you can have your policy finalized in 10 minutes. There are even a number of comparison sites that will help you get the best deal on your policy.

Related: Dog Insurance Dos and Don’ts

MYTH: Dog Insurance Has Too Many Exclusions. Some people think that dog insurance isn’t worth it, because too many kinds of treatments aren’t included in the coverage. Sure, the cost of elective or routine treatments, such as neutering, tooth cleaning and vaccinations generally comes out of your own pocket, but there are special kinds of policies that will cover routine care. Plus more unusual or alternative treatments are becoming included. For instance, some insurers will pay out for holistic or natural treatments, doggy behaviorists, acupuncture and more.

MYTH: Dog Insurance is Only for Sick Pets. If you think that dog insurance is only useful if your dog is sick or injured, then you have things back to front. In fact, if you wait until your dog is ill to insure him, then it’s already too late, since all existing conditions will be excluded from your insurance policy.

MYTH: You Can’t Insure Old Dogs. Sure, it might cost a little bit more to insure an older dog, but it’s not impossible. Ideally, you should insure your dog from an early age, but that’s not always a viable option, especially if you choose to bring home an older rescue dog. So, don’t avoid getting dog insurance just because your four-legged friend is no spring chicken…. uh, dog.

MYTH: It’s Hard to Make a Claim. Making a claim shouldn’t be difficult. All you need to do is contact the insurance company, fill out a form and send it off with any relevant details. In most cases, your veterinarian will be happy to fill out the form for you and dig out any supporting evidence. After all, if the form is filled in correctly then the vet knows they’re going to get paid!

loznnolaLauren Corona is a freelance writer from merry old England. She specializes in writing about dogs and other critters. Lauren lives near Oxford, with her gorgeous Doberman, Nola. When she’s not tapping away at the keyboard, you’ll find her walking in the woods with Nola-dog, raising money for the Oxfordshire Animal Sanctuary, cooking vegan food, making zines and writing about herself in the third person.


Comments

  • Lauren

    I’d have to say that you’re right about labeling the first criticism a myth is correct-to a point. I’ve been looking at several options and I’ve found just a few limitations. In fact, Figo was the first option where I found a lot of exclusions. On a similar note, you should’ve mentioned breed being an exclusion.