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February 9, 2013 PetGuide
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Toy Fox Terrier

 
  • Height: 8-12 inches
  • Weight: 3-7 lb
  • Lifespan: 12-15 years
  • Group: AKC Toy
  • Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
  • Temperament: Inquisitive, feisty, adventurous, energetic
  • Comparable Breeds: Chihuahua, Rat Terrier

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A wonderful combination of both a toy breed and a terrier breed, the Toy Fox Terrier can be a bit like the Napoleon of the dog world: small in stature, but full of confidence. Able to complete a number of tasks just like the Toy Fox Terrier, but coming in a little package, it’s hard to deny that this dog can be one of the most endearing breeds around. After all, it’s rare to find a toy breed so durable, sturdy, and generally outgoing. These qualities are a mark of the Toy Fox Terrier’s unique pedigree, which we’ll detail in this overview of the breed.

Is a Toy Fox Terrier for you? That depends on what kind of dog you’re looking for. It’s not a cold-weather dog, but it is suited for apartment life, so it can do well in a number of warmer cities and will not go crazy without a gigantic yard to dwell in. Active dogs that do require a daily walk, they will be noticeable and far from the personality of a cat, which can be a bit difficult if you also own cats. Let’s take a closer look at this interesting and unique toy breed that can really be described as a big dog in a toy dog’s body.

The Toy Fox Terrier can be a bit like the Napoleon of the dog world: small in stature, but full of confidence.

The Toy Fox Terrier’s status as a great hybrid of toy and terrier is the result of its pedigree, which we’ll get into in the next section. Having been bred from Fox Terriers originally, this is a uniquely American breed because it saw its first development in the U.S. in the 1930s, being crossed with a number of toy breeds to create what is essentially a small, rambunctious version of the Fox Terrier.

With its first use as hunting rats, it’s apparent that the Toy Fox Terrier was not only a show dog from its early days, but actually be of some use around the house and yard to get tasks done. First recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2003, this is still an American breed with a uniquely American heritage – so if you’ve been looking for a home-grown breed, this might just be the dog for you.

A little bit more detail can be said about the dog’s pedigree because it’s been well-documented, having originated in the 20th century. This cannot be said of all dogs that have more peculiar and mysterious histories, but the Toy Fox Terrier has a specific pedigree that can be quickly identified.

And what is that pedigree? It descends mostly from Fox Terriers, of course, but was mixed with breeds like Manchester Terriers, Italian Greyhounds, Chihuahuas, and Miniature Pinschers to create what is essentially a miniature Fox Terrier. The breeding means that the Toy Fox Terrier has taken on some qualities of these other breeds. And as these other breeds are frequently suited for city life themselves, it stands that the Toy Fox Terrier is as well. An outgoing, confident personality comes as the result of this overall breeding and pedigree.

A tiny dog with a tiny weight, you’ll want to take special care not to overfeed this breed. Keep in mind that a normal dog diet should be reduced to suit the caloric needs of this toy breed. The usual foods, however, including eggs, meat, and whole vegetables, should be included.

Although the dog is physically small, you’ll be surprised at just how much of the Fox Terrier personality it has retained, making it obedient and willing to work.

Although the dog is physically small, you’ll be surprised at just how much of the Fox Terrier personality it has retained, making it obedient and willing to work. They can be a bit stubborn in the face of improper training, but through discipline and patience they can easily be taught a number of things, especially their boundaries around the home.

Weighing only three to seven pounds, this dog is indeed a toy breed. Even though its personality is strong, keep in mind that it can be a very delicate creature. Overfeeding is a potential concern because even one pound on a seven-pound frame is a significant weight gain.

Intelligent, obedient, willing to work, this is the kind of toy dog that people who really love “working” dogs can still enjoy. It’s small but with the personality of a regular terrier, in many ways, and will even show these instincts by hunting small rodents and pests around the house. Given good discipline, it will be a good companion and willing to obey commands. Because it’s a small dog, be sure to teach children how to handle it and not to be aggressive with it.

This dog is generally healthy but can be prone to allergies to beets and corn, so you’ll want to be wary of these foods as you plan the Toy Fox Terrier’s diet.

Living 12 to 15 years, this can be a long-term healthy and durable breed capable for your family.

Play is important; a daily walk is, as well, and they love a good yard. Just make sure the yard or area is fenced in, as these little dogs can escape through cracks and holes fairly easily. As they are small dogs, remember that their small strides can mean extra work to keep up with you.

Intelligent, obedient, willing to work, this is the kind of toy dog that people who really love working dogs can still enjoy.

The American Kennel Club, only recognizing this breed in 2003, says this of the Toy Fox Terrier: “Truly an American breed, the Toy Fox Terrier is a big dog in a small package that possesses intelligence, courage and a take-charge attitude.”

Easy to groom and a light shedder with a short coat, this dog will be easy to take care of: occasional brushing/combing should be all that’s required. The coat should be shiny and cover the entire body.

Raising a puppy of this breed should not be difficult. As usual, establishing discipline and boundaries will be important. Because children can injure these tiny dogs easily, you should teach them how to handle the dog right away.


Comparable Breeds

Go to Chihuahua

Chihuahua

  • Height: 6-9 inches
  • Weight: 2-6 lb
  • Lifespan: 14-18 years
  • Group: AKC Toy
  • Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
  • Temperament: Lively, timid, affectionate, devoted
  • Comparable Breeds: Papillon, Pekingese
Go to Rat Terrier

Rat Terrier

  • Height: 14-23 inches
  • Weight: 12-35 lb
  • Lifespan: 15-18 years
  • Group: AKC Terrier
  • Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards, farms/rural areas
  • Temperament: Loyal, active, playful, intelligent
  • Comparable Breeds: Toy Fox Terrier, Jack Russell Terrier