After Being Mistakenly Sent to Japan, Dog Gets Home on a Private Jet

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After a dog died on one of their flights because her owner was forced to stow her in the overhead bin, the third-largest airline company in the world managed to enrage animal lover everywhere once again, when they mistakenly sent a family pet to Japan– instead to Kansas. With over 6,000 miles between them, the dog’s family was out of their minds with worry for their fur baby.

Irgo, the 10-year old German Shepherd that unwillingly visited Asia, was confused with a Great Dane named Lincoln, who was supposed to join his family in Naruto, Japan. Thankfully, the pawrents managed to get in touch over Facebook and ensure both of the dogs were in good hands until the mixup resolves.

Considering that the unfortunate death of the puppy on one of their flights happened just the day before, United Airlines were more than efficient in fixing this situation. In circa 48 hours, Irgo was reunited with his family, and the company spared no expense to ensure a happy ending: the German Shepherd was flown in on a private jet. Although the company officials didn’t want to say how much a trip like that set them back, some estimates indicate that it cost roughly $90,000.

There are no mentions of the Great Dane who was presumably also reunited with his pawrents, so we don’t know if this pooch got the 5-star luxury treatment as well or had to travel in a regular cabin. I just hope he arrived home without any trouble- a 13-hour flight is no small feat for a pupper!

It warms my heart to hear that the situation’s been resolved and that the four-legged babies are back with their families, but it’s sad that accidents like this happen in the first place. Isn’t it high time for pets to get the treatment they deserve when travelling with their families, instead of being treated like innanimate objects? Although the statistics indicate that United Airlines is the deadliest airline company for pets, we can only hope that they’ll learn from their mistakes and turn over a new leaf.