Irish Red and White Setter

 
  • Height: 22-26 inches
  • Weight: 50-75 lb
  • Lifespan: 10-15 years
  • Group: AKC Sporting
  • Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
  • Temperament: Athletic, strong, intelligent, affectionate
  • Comparable Breeds: Irish Setter, English Springer Spaniel

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Can you keep up with the Irish Red and White Setter? Sturdy and quick without being bulky or too lean, the Irish Red and White Setter is made for effortless running. This breed is acutely aware of its surroundings, particularly when its owners are around. Always up for an adventure, the Irish Red and White Setter is ready for a walk at any time – this is a curious that takes great joy in exploring the world outside.

Athletic, strong, intelligent, affectionate, energetic, and loving, Irish Red and White Setters are great with children and other pets. Does this dog sound like a fit for your family? Read on to find out more.

Always up for an adventure, the Irish Red and White Setter is ready for a walk at any time.

Originating in Ireland during the 1700s, these setters were used for the purpose of hunting birds. Originally, all Irish Setters were mostly red, or red and white, but in 1880, breeders to strictly breed the solid red variety. This resulted in a close extinction of the Irish Red and White Setter, but in the early 1940, a group of admirers began to rebuild and renew interest in this breed. The Irish Red and White Setter is making a comeback, but its growth is slow and steady.

Here’s an interesting tidbit: the Red and White Setter is the foundation breed for the Irish Setter.

The Irish Red and White Setter was recognized by the AKC in 2009.

There is no one particular diet that is best for your Irish Red and White Setter. You should always feed your dog the best quality food you can, one with quality ingredients and fewer byproducts. Complete dog foods will have all the vitamins and minerals needed for both puppies and adults.

Athletic, strong, intelligent, affectionate, energetic, and loving, Irish Red and White Setters are great with children and other pets.

Training is necessary and fairly easy with the Irish Red and White Setter, as long as you start at an early age. You will need to challenge the Red and White Setter throughout the training process so that it doesn’t become bored. Since young dogs are full of boundless energy and easily distracted, you may have your work cut out for you. It may be helpful if you isolate your Irish Red and White Setter from other dogs and potential distractions while training them.

Red and White Setters will not respond well to negative training or loud or raised voices. In fact, it may become timid or will avoid people is this training method is employed.

This breed quickly learns when it comes to what you want, but on the flip side, it will also learn what it can get away with. Even if this is your first dog, most people won’t have much trouble working with the Irish Red and White Setter, as long as you use a consistent, firm and loving training style.

Both male and female Irish Red and White Setters weigh 50 to 75 pounds.

The Irish Red and White Setter is a fairly even-tempered and friendly dog, making it a wonderful family pet, especially for active families that spend a great deal of time outdoors. This breed does not make a good watchdog, as it is too friendly and eager to please people to protect the family or your property.

The Red and White Setter is a working dog and it enjoys the thrill of the hunt. Since it is an excellent tracker, a game of hide and seek will keep it entertained and will give it much-needed exercise.  Because this breed is easy to train, the Irish Red and White Setter makes a great competition and field competition dog. A social pooch, the Irish Red and White Setter likes to be around people. But if you are away from home most of the day, this breed will be fine if it has other dogs to keep it company.  Because it needs a fair bit of exercise, the Irish Red and White Setter don’t like to spend too much time in kennels or confined spaces.

There are few genetic issues that affect the Irish Red and White Setter. Before bringing your puppy home, check to see if there is a history of hip dysplasia or cataracts in the lineage. Always ask for full disclosure from breeders when it comes to the medical history of the parental line and have the puppy checked by a vet for any problems.

Irish Red and White Setters have a life expectancy of 10 to 15 years.

You’ll need to be aware of a few genetic issues that are common with the Irish Red and White Setter. Before bringing a puppy home, check the dog’s lineage for a history of hip dysplasia or cataracts. You should always get a full disclosure from breeders about the medical history of the parental line and have your puppy checked by a vet for any problems before agreeing to the sale.

The Irish Red and White Setter is a fairly even-tempered and friendly dog, making it a wonderful family pet.

The American Kennel Club says this about the breed: “Despite its name, the Irish Red and White Setter is a distinct breed, not just a different colored version of the Irish Setter. Bred primarily for the field, they should be strong, powerful and athletic, with a keen and intelligent attitude. The coat’s base color is white with solid red patches.”

The Irish Red and White Setter’s medium-length coat features a white base and the solid red patches. The coat should be wavy, not curly. Its nose and legs can have some mottling and flecking, but these areas shouldn’t be roan (red and white evenly mixed).

Expect to put in some grooming time with these coats. Irish Red and White Setters shed and will leave evidence of its existence everywhere it goes. While it sheds non-stop, about twice a year this breed sheds quite heavily. Females of the breed are thought to shed more heavily when in heat.

So much energy comes from the Irish Red and White Setter puppy. Like most breeds, training should start early to help curb bad habits.


Comparable Breeds

Go to Irish Setter

Irish Setter

  • Height: 24-28 inches
  • Weight: 55-75 lb
  • Lifespan: 11-15 years
  • Group: AKC Sporting
  • Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles and seniors, houses with yards
  • Temperament: Energetic, enthusiastic, good natured, sociable
  • Comparable Breeds: Golden Retriever, Labrador Retriever
Go to English Springer Spaniel

English Springer Spaniel

  • Height: 18-21 inches
  • Weight: 40-55 lb
  • Lifespan: 12-14 years
  • Group: AKC Sporting
  • Best Suited For: Families with children, active singles, apartments, houses with/without yards
  • Temperament: Cheerful, social, lively, loyal
  • Comparable Breeds: Cocker Spaniel, Golden Retriever