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Can Dogs Eat Apples?

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Pet parents love to know that their fur babies enjoy the same goodies in life as they do, but when it comes to food, what’s superb for you, might not be good for Fido. Thankfully, apples don’t fall into that category: not only that you don’t have to wonder can dogs eat apples, but this delicious fruit can also be a great healthy snack for them.

In addition to being tasty to pooches and humans alike, apples are a great source of essential vitamins and nutrients for canines. Apples are also a fantastic source of fiber and can freshen your pupper’s breath- if only for a short while. While there is a lot of fruit that your pooch can safely munch on, apples are a universal favorite- they are readily available, affordable, and doggos can’t get enough of their sweet flavor.

But, as it’s usually the case with feeding human food to a dog, there are some things you’ll need to pay attention to if you want to avoid any potential problems. So, if you’re wondering how to safely feed apples to a dog, can dogs eat apples without any side effects and if they have any benefits for their health, read on!

Unlike cats, dogs are not obligate carnivores. This means that, while they’ll love a bit of bacon or chicken on their plate, they don’t rely solely on meat to get all their nutrients. In fact, a dog’s diet should be almost as diverse as ours. According to scientific research, ideally, a canine’s diet should consist of a healthy mix of protein, healthy fats and essential fatty acids ( such as Omega 3 and Omega 6), carbohydrates, and an array of vitamins and minerals. While commercial dog food is often fortified with the necessary nutrients, it doesn’t hurt including a fresh source of vitamins as a healthy snack. That’s where apples come in!

Apples are rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and are an excellent source of dietary fiber. When it comes to dogs, out of all that abundance of healthy substances, the ones that count are Vitamin A and C. While canines can metabolize Vitamin C on their own, adding a source of it in their diet could have a positive effect on their resilience to stress-related conditions and diseases. As for Vitamin A, it helps promote a shiny coat and a healthy skin, and it supports the overall health of a dog.

Additionally, as a source of dietary fiber, apples are a great way to improve and preserve the gastrointestinal health of your pet. In some cases, adding high fiber snacks could help a dog who’s having troubles in the poop department: eating apples could resolve issues with constipation or diarrhea.

Of course, it goes without saying that you should talk to your vet before deciding to incorporate apples as a regular part of your diet or as a substitute for supplements. Depending on your dog’s diet, eating apples might be counterproductive. Not all dogs are the same and not all of them will have the same reaction to eating fruit, so it’s best to be safe than sorry. After all, there are some risks to feeding your dog apples, as well.

Don’t worry: unless they happen to be severely allergic to apples, your precious four-legged friend won’t go foaming at the mouth when they eat an apple slice. I mean, that’s if you don’t count that excited I’m-so-hungry-give-me-the-snack drool. Of course, this doesn’t mean that you should go and give your dog a whole apple and forget about it!

Yes, dogs can eat apples, but in a particular dose and, well, form. Here’s what you should avoid:

Apple cores: We all probably have that friend whose aunt gave her mutt apple cores and they’ve lived to ripe old age- you know, the one that would probably laugh at you for asking can dogs eat apples in the first place. Someone’s luck doesn’t mean that dogs can eat apple cores- in fact, it would be better not to risk it. And it’s not only because the seeds contain cyanide (a seed or two wouldn’t poison your dog, but why risk an adverse reaction?), but because the tough center of the apple can be a choking hazard, particularly for small dogs.

Dehydrated apples: dried fruit is quite deceptive- what seems like a tiny snack actually packs a powerful punch, as a pound of apples can fit inside of your palm when dehydrated. More sensitive pooches could experience an upset stomach and feel sick after eating too many dried apple chips.

In addition to removing apples seeds and core before feeding your dog some apple bites, it’s also important to take care of the quantities you’re giving them. Apples are supposed to be an occasional treat to a dog, and not a whole meal. To make sure your dog actually likes apples and that this fruit doesn’t bother their tiny tummy, start with a bite or two before progressing onto whole slices.

You might think that there’s no art about it. As dogs can eat apples, you just core them, peel them, slice them and look at your pooch’s happy face while they gobble them down. Sure, you can do it that way. But in case you want to get creative and make a fabulous treat for your precious furry baby, take a look at some of our recipes for inspiration!

What better way for your furry companion to enjoy the bounty of the fall season than by nibbling on delicious apple muffin? Scratch that, it doesn’t even have to be the harvest season if you want to whip up these babies- all you need for the recipe is apples, applesauce, honey, peanut butter and a few pantry staples.

The smell spreading from the oven will make your mouth water, let alone your pet’s! For these dog yummies, you’ll need only 6 ingredients: applesauce, honey, eggs, cinnamon, rolled oats and oat flour.

OK, sue us- but sometimes, the fruit needs reinforcement. Not all dogs share their enthusiasm for apples! In these cases, you can’t go wrong with these mouth-watering treats- not only that they’re simple to make, but flaunt some seriously delicious ingredients (face it, nobody can resist cheddar and bacon)!

It’s no shame admitting that your four-legged baby has stinky breath. Baring any medical issues that could be the cause of it, smelly dog breath can be quite improved after a few of these refreshing treats! To make a batch of these dog cookies, you’ll need banana and apple for flavor, flour and eggs for texture, and a bit of mint and parsley to combat that foul smell coming out of your doggo’s mouth.

Perfectly crunchy and mouth-melting, these crispy treats will be a hit with any pupper. Granted, they might not get to verify the mouth-melting part as they tend to gobble them down in seconds, but, hey, they do love these. Apples, flour, oats, eggs, cinnamon, flax seeds, and coconut oil- after all, with an ingredient list like this, what’s not to love!

Yes, all doggos are good boys (and girls!), nobody’s fighting you on that. However, the word devilish in the recipe’s title doesn’t stand for the mischief that some canines are known for. It’s to tell you how devilishly good these nom-noms are! And you won’t need any dubious ingredients to make them: in addition to pumpkin and apple puree, the list includes flour, olive oil, flax seeds, and eggs.

Honestly, it’s hard to imagine a dog who goes nuts for leafy greens (or a human, for that matter). So what better way to sneak some of them into your puppy’s belly than by masking kale with the sweet aroma of apple and presenting it in the form of a crunchy treat? Devious, yes, but also healthy and super tasty- the recipe calls for flaxseed, flour, veggie broth, egg, and cinnamon, too.

Get into the festive mood with some holiday-worthy dog treats! Sure, it doesn’t have to be Christmas for your dog to appreciate these homemade yummies, but these are an excellent choice for a traditional holiday treat for your pet. The applesauce in the recipe goes perfectly with cinnamon and the grated carrot- all you need to add is flour and egg, and you’ve got yourself a batch of irresistible and healthy dog treats!

Is your four-legged bestie sensitive to wheat? Fear not, that doesn’t mean that they won’t get to enjoy one of our apple-themed treats. To make these, you’ll be using rice flour and gluten-free rolled oats, so there won’t be pesky gluten to irritate your dog’s stomach. Top it with some cinnamon, eggs, olive oil and applesauce, and you’re all set to serve your pet with some delicious baked treats.


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