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A Jet Setters Guide To Dog Travel Insurance

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The open road beckons. You’re a world (or country) traveler and you don’t like to stay in one spot too long. And you like to bring your dog with you. Whether you’re a jet setter or a road-trip warrior, if you’re bringing Fido along for the ride, you need to look into Dog Travel Insurance.

Your dog may be healthy before you leave home, but when she gets sick during your travels, you’re pooched! The subsequent and unexpected vet expenses can be challenging for traveling dog owners. With Dog Travel Insurance, if your dog gets sick or has an accident while you’re away, you can take her into a vet for treatment. Just knowing that your dog’s medical expenses are covered will be a weight off your mind.

Dog Travel Insurance also covers your pup when shipping them to another location. This would come in handy if you were moving across the country and wanted to safely ship your dog, either by car, truck or airplane.

This type of insurance covers expenses relating to accidents or issues when pets are traveling.  This can include consultations, x-rays, injections, medications, exploratory examinations, tests and surgical treatments. You may have to shop around to find this coverage, as not all policies offer it. However, you may already have this coverage already, lumped in with your existing policy. Dog Travel Insurance covers vet bills and travel costs up to a certain amount, which is based on how much your do is insured for.

Whether you’re a jet setter or a road-trip warrior, if you’re bringing Fido along for the ride, you need to look into Dog Travel Insurance.

Depending on where you purchase your Dog Travel Insurance, there may be added perks involved. Some policies include a holiday cancellation clause, just in case your dog becomes ill during or shortly before your vacation and you have to return home for treatment. As well, it can also cover theft or straying, in the case when your dog is missing and you have to return home.

Before committing to any Dog Travel Insurance plan, do your homework – some plans are limited and may not offer any real protection for your pooch. If you do take your dog to a vet, kennel or other related service, always get the proper documentation. Most insurance companies won’t reimburse without some kind of receipt. Before you go away, the insurance company may insist that you take your dog to your own vet to ensure that she is healthy and has all her shots before you take off.


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