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February 15, 2019 PetGuide
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Dorkie

 
  • Height: 5-8 inches
  • Weight: 5-20 lbs
  • Lifespan: 13-16 years
  • Group: Not applicable
  • Best Suited For: Singles, seniors, people who live in an apartment, families with older children
  • Temperament: Affectionate, loyal, sweet, intelligent, stubborn, lively, spunky, feisty, playful
  • Comparable Breeds: Dachshund, Yorkshire Terrier

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Dorkie is a tiny dog that wants a lot of attention- and you can bet you’ll want to give it. These adorable petite pooches might have a big attitude but they have an even bigger heart which will definitely win you over. As a mixed breed dog, the Dorkie has two purebred parents: the lively Dachshund and the feisty Yorkshire Terrier. Naturally, it’s not possible to accurately predict what the personality and looks of a crossbreed will be, but in most cases, these hybrids inherit traits from both parents.

The Doxie Yorkie mix will be an easy-going, lively, affectionate dog. Their sweet nature makes them an ideal companion, and they tend to form a strong attachment to one special family member above all others. This, in combination with their low activity needs, makes the Dorkie an ideal pet for retirees or singles. These designer dogs can also be marvelous family pets, too, but only if the children are a bit older. Young kids tend to play a bit ruff, and the feisty Dorkie won’t appreciate that at all. If you want to make sure that the Dachshund and Yorkshire Terrier mix dog is the right fit for your family, read on!

The Doxie Yorkie mix will be an easy-going, lively, affectionate dog.

The Doxie Yorkie mix will be an easy-going, lively, affectionate dog- ideal for a furry companion.Designer dogs are a big deal in the world of canine breeds-  they’re highly popular and a lot of people are falling in love with these crossbreeds. Unfortunately, their fame doesn’t mean that we have a lot of information about hybrids. In comparison to purebred dogs, designer dogs are still a phenomenon in development. As a result, the origin of many singular dog breeds, such as te Dorkie, remains a mystery. But not a complete one! Based on what we know about designer dogs in general, it’s safe to assume that this Doxie Yorkie mix also had its start in the United States, sometime in the last thirty years.

However, even though we might not know the name of the breeder who produced the first litter of Dorkie puppies, the reason why this breed was created is quite clear. Not only that these hybrids are cute as they come, but they represent a perfect companion for many pet owners. And having in mind the many lovely qualities of their parents, this really shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone.

The Dorkie is the offspring of Dachshund and Yorkie, and the American Kennel Club doesn’t recognize crossbreeds. As a result, Yorkie puppies don’t have any official pedigree papers that document their lineage. In case you got your Doxie Yorkie mix from a reputable breeder, he or she will be able to provide the papers for the purebred parents. You could even arrange to meet the mom and dad of your new pet- it’s the only way to get a glimpse of how the puppy will look or act when they grow up.

And in the case you adorable Dorkie comes from a shelter or a rescue, you should rely on the knowledge we have about his parental breeds for more information about their traits. Both the Dachshund and the Yorkie make lovely pets and have a reputation to be spunky, affectionate companions.

It’s important to make sure your pet has a healthy, well-balanced diet. Canines are omnivores, but the fact that their diet is diverse doesn’t mean they can (or should) eat anything. Ideally, their daily meals should have a proper ratio of proteins, healthy fats, and complex carbohydrates, as well as plenty of important vitamins and minerals. In most cases, high-quality dry food for dogs offers all of this in the convenient form of kibble.

For your Dorkie, choose kibble that’s suitable for their own unique needs. Their food should be appropriate for their age (puppy, adult, seniors) size, and activity level (kibble for toy or small breeds should be a good fit). From time to time, you can “spice things up” for your tiny doggo by sprinkling his kibble with a bit of wet food or home-cooked delicacies (meat and veggies, without seasoning).

Also, you should have in mind that the Doxie Yorkie mix dog is small and he won’t need much food to be full. On average, a cup of kibble should be enough to meet his needs- check the feeding guide for recommendations. It’s important not to give in to Dorkie’s begging for extra treats or free feed them, as this can lead to weight gain. Dorkie is prone to obesity and getting extra fluff could lead to a host of health issues.

In addition to being cute and sweet, Dorkies have a feisty, mischievous side to them.

The Dorkie doesn’t differ much from most small breed dogs, which means you can expect him to be smart as a whip but with a tendency for stubbornness, too. These cute hybrids adore their owners and are eager to please, but sometimes, the training can be too boring for them to even try and learn! Luckily, there’s a trick that always works- having the right incentive. Positive reinforcement training means that you use rewards, such as excited praise or treats, to motivate your pet to repeat the desirable behavior (e.g. going outside to pee or sitting on command).

Start with training and socialization as early as possible. The sooner you begin teaching your pet what proper behavior is, the less work you’ll have. Basic obedience and commands, as well as potty training, are a starting point for most people. Additionally, teaching your puppy how to walk on a leash is a must- they can’t pull the lead, but you’ll definitely want them to behave on walks.

The Yorkshire Terrier and the Dachshund are both petite, but there still are some size differences between the too. Depending on which parent your puppy favors, they can weigh between 5 to 20 pounds once fully mature.

The Doxie Yorkie mix will be an easy-going, lively, affectionate dog- ideal for a furry companion.Every single dog has its own unique personality. And all dog parents know this: the personal quirks and behaviors are what makes us every pooch special in their own way. However, there’s no denying that centuries of selective breeding do have an impact on a dog’s temperament. The Dorkie might have not been around for long (or bred selectively, for that matter), but he still inherits a lot of traits from his parents. You can expect your new pooch to be a combination of the Doxie and Yorkie both, or take up after one of them more.

Usually, these designer dogs are very affectionate, sweet, and completely devoted to their owners. The fierce loyalty of this petite pooch will surprise you! If they had gone through basic training and socialization, they will also be friendly to people outside of the family and get along with other dogs. They do have genes of a vermin hunter, so high prey drive towards small critters is possible.

In addition to being cute and sweet, Dorkies have a feisty, mischievous side to them. They are full of spunk and curiosity, and they’ll often be very playful dogs. Don’t forget- both the Doxie and the Yorkie are highly intelligent and tenacious breeds, so their offspring will definitely need some quality mental stimulation. Puzzle toys or interactive toys are a great choice to get their brain going and entertain them for hours on end. To boot, this will ward off boredom and destructive behaviors that stem from it, like chewing or digging.

With designer dogs, all bets are off- you never know what to expect. The same goes for their health. Some breeders claim that first generation mixes, such as the Dorkie, are healthier than the purebred parents, while others remain skeptical and worry that designer dogs are at risk for two sets of breed-specific issues.

In general, it all depends on the parents and breeding practices. If the mom and dad are healthy, and the breeder is responsible for his practices, there usually isn’t much reason for worry. However, there is always the possibility that your dog will inherit a genetic condition, including illnesses such as a portosystemic shunt, collapsing tracheas, canine disc disease, epilepsy, Legg Calve Perthes disease, patellar luxation, and progressive retinal atrophy.

Since this is a small breed dog, you should take measures to prevent issues common for canines of this size. This includes plaque buildup that leads to early tooth loss, as well as obesity.

The life expectancy for the Dorkie is 13 to 16 years.

Even though lively and energetic, Dorkie is not an active dog. In fact, some people would even categorize them as lazy- but the truth is closer to the middle. The playful nature and curious mind of the Dorkie will make him interested in all the fun activities you can think of, from sniffing around the doggie park to exploring the neighborhood on a leash. Granted, his capacity for activity is much more modest than that of large dogs. On average, 30 to 45 minutes of exercise is all it takes to keep Dorkie happy and healthy. They need daily brisk walks on fresh air and would benefit from engaging playtime with their owner. Not only that they cherish every opportunity to be in the center of their owner’s attention, but they’ll also appreciate the mental stimulation that goes with it.   

The fact that the Dorkie doesn’t need much daily exercise to be content, as well as its compact size, make this mixed breed dog perfect for life in an apartment or condo. Additionally, seniors or retirees might find that this designer dog is exactly what they need- low on activity requirements but high on sweetness and affection!

On average, 30 to 45 minutes of exercise is all it takes to keep Dorkie happy and healthy.

The AKC might not recognize Doxie Yorkie mix dog as an actual breed, but there are plenty of smaller clubs that do. The American Canine Hybrid Club, Designer Breed Registry, Designer Dogs Kennel Club, Dog Registry of America all recognize this breed as Dorkie. The International Designer Canine Registry recognizes it under the name Dorkie Terrier.

The Doxie comes in 3 different coat types, which complicates things a bit. Their hair can be long, short, or wiry and it will significantly influence the appearance of their mixed breed babies. However, as a rule of thumb, Dorkie has medium length hair that sheds moderately. Usually, the Yorkie genes are more dominant when it comes to coloring, so the puppies are often blue and tan, black and tan, black and brown or blue and gold.

Grooming them is not taxing- a daily brush will keep them looking their best.

Owing to size differences, the Yorkie in this mix is always the dad, and Doxie is the mom of the breed. This means that the average litter size for this hybrid is 2 to 5 puppies. Dorkie puppies are very small, so make sure to be extremely gentle with them. Injuries happen easily when they’re young, and leaving them around kids without supervision is never a good idea. Handling a Dorkie puppy should be done with utmost care to prevent any accidents.

Even so, you should start with their training while their still young and pliable- Puppy Kindergarten classes are a great idea. Once your adorable puppy grows up with good guidance and manners, you can count on them becoming a lovely pet. Friendly, sweet, and playful, Dorkies make fantastic companions for singles, seniors, and apartment dwellers.

Photo credit: Steve Bruckmann/Shutterstock


Comparable Breeds

Go to Dachshund

Dachshund

  • Height: 14-18 inches
  • Weight: 9-20 lb
  • Lifespan: 12-15 years
  • Group: AKC Hound
  • Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
  • Temperament: Playful, outgoing, active, affectionate
  • Comparable Breeds: Border Terrier, Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Go to Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire Terrier

  • Height: 6-8 inches
  • Weight: 6-7 lb
  • Lifespan: 12-15 years
  • Group: AKC Toy
  • Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
  • Temperament: Feisty, stubborn, cuddly, inquisitive
  • Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Pomeranian