The Pros of Bringing Home a Rescue Dog

We’re Pro Adoption – so here are a few pros for why you should adopt a dog


Although bringing home a dog from a shelter is becoming more and more commonplace, rescue pooches still get a bad name now and then. Some people believe that all rescue dogs are in a shelter because of negative traits, such as behavioral issues or psychological problems, but this simply isn’t true. Sure, some rescue pups do need more TLC than others, but these kinds of dogs will usually only be entrusted to experienced homes. If you’re thinking about bringing home a rescue dog, it’s best to think about all the positives and the joy that a dog could bring to your life.


You’re Providing a Dog with a Much Needed Home


The Humane Society of America estimates that around 3 to 4 million unwanted cats and dogs are euthanized every year. If you rescue a dog from a shelter, then you’re giving one of these animals a second chance and may even be saving his life. When you adopt from a shelter, that also frees up a space for another dog who’s in need of a place to stay. If that doesn’t make you feel good about yourself, then what will?


You Can Find Dogs of All Types


Some people get put off rescuing a dog because they have a very specific idea about the breed or age of dog that they want. You might be surprised at how many different kinds of dogs you can find at a shelter. Purebred dogs are not much less likely to end up in a shelter than mixed breeds, so it’s fairly easy to find one who needs a new home. If you have a specific type of dog in mind, you may be able to find a local shelter who specialize in rehoming only dogs of a certain breed, these are often referred to as “breed rescues.” Don’t be disheartened if you want a puppy, either, because a saddeningly large amount of puppies end up in shelters too. Often, these puppies are a result of an unexpected pregnancy, which the owner of the mommy-dog just couldn’t afford.


It’s Cheaper Than Buying a Dog


If money is a concern for you, consider that rescuing a dog is likely to cost you less than it would to buy a dog from a breeder. While you might have to give a shelter a donation of a couple of hundred bucks or so when you adopt a dog, buying puppy from any breeder is going to set you back a sizable chunk of cash, especially if they are – or at least claim to be – a responsible breeder. Plus you’ve got to consider what you get for your money when you adopt a rescue dog. A rescue pooch will usually be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, microchipped, de-flead and de-wormed, which is going to save you a whole bundle of money, too. Plus, you should think about where your money goes to. Get a dog from a shelter and the money you give them will go to help other animals in need.


They May Already be Trained


Dogs end up in shelters for all kinds of reasons, so many of them will already be housebroken and have some training. This is going to save you a lot of the time, effort and frustration that can come with training a pooch. If you’re a new dog owner and are unsure about your training skills, it’s a huge bonus to have a dog who comes to you already knowing how to obey a number of commands. Who knows, you might even end up adopting a veritable doggy Einstein.

Lauren Corona is a freelance writer from merry old England. She specializes in writing about dogs and other critters. Lauren lives near Oxford, with her gorgeous Doberman, Nola. When she’s not tapping away at the keyboard, you’ll find her walking in the woods with Nola-dog, raising money for the Oxfordshire Animal Sanctuary, cooking vegan food, making zines and writing about herself in the third person.

Lauren Corona
Lauren Corona

Lauren Corona is a freelance writer from merry old England. She specializes in writing about dogs and other critters. Lauren lives near Oxford, with her gorgeous Doberman, Nola. When she's not tapping away at the keyboard, you'll find her walking in the woods with Nola-dog, raising money for the Oxfordshire Animal Sanctuary, cooking vegan food, making zines and writing about herself in the third person.

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