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Certain Breeds Get The Boot From Luxe Co-Op, Owners Cry ‘Dog Racism’

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Not since Donald Trump challenged Barack Obama to produce a birth certificate proving citizenship has the discussion around lineage been so hotly debated.

It seems the hoity-toity board of a luxury New York co-op has concerns that “troublesome” breeds may be allowed within their hallowed halls and has decided wannabe residents must first have the building’s on-call vet verify Rover’s family history.

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So forget the security deposit and don’t bother with references; if your pooch’s pedigree can’t be determined and the resulting DNA test shows he’s on the “bad boy” list, you ain’t going anywhere!

The rationale provided by the tiny team of tyrants at 170 West End Ave. is that genetic make-up can result in unwanted behaviors such as aggression. So heady with veto power and armed with a raft of documents, the board compiled the dreaded “list” – and it’s a big one – 27 breeds. Understandably they have banned the fearsome Maltese and Shih Tzu as well as those intimidating Pomeranians, but they are also looking at the mix/percentage of each breed in a bid to assess the potential trouble your little guy could cause.  So if your pup’s second uncle once-removed was a bad ‘un, this may spell trouble for you.

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But it gets worse. The rule book isn’t waiting to be thrown at just those wanting to move into the building, it also applies to existing residents. As the board states, the policy is designed to purge the building of any pedigrees they deem troublesome.  And they require a mug shot of each dog… for some reason. Don’t you just know that coming down the line is a request for residents to produce their sheepskin to prove they got the smarts to live among the privileged?

Of course residents are crying “dog racism” and consider the new policy outrageous, intrusive and worthy of a formal protest.

Sylvia Shapiro, a lawyer and the author of the book “The New York Co-op Bible,” said it’s not uncommon for boards to place restrictions on dogs but she has never heard of a policy like this one and smells a lawsuit for dog discrimination.

“The problem with dogs is not the dogs, it’s the owners,” Shapiro said. “There seems to be a lot of irrational people around.”  You think?

[Source: DNAinfo]


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