`
April 2, 2019 PetGuide
PetGuide logo

Boston Yorkie

 
  • Height: 9-17 inches
  • Weight: 10-25 lbs
  • Lifespan: 12-15 years
  • Group: Not applicable
  • Best Suited For: Singles, seniors, people who live in an apartment, families with older children
  • Temperament: Lively, sweet, intelligent, cuddly, affectionate, curious, stubborn, friendly
  • Comparable Breeds: Boston Terrier, Yorkshire Terrier

New Search

A perfect pet for people who live in an apartment, the Boston Yorkie is a small and spirited dog. These handsome pooches have unique looks, often with a shaggy coat and distinct tuxedo markings, but it’s not only their looks that make them popular. The Boston Yorkie is an affectionate, sweet dog with a fun-loving attitude, whose feisty behavior will definitely amuse you to no end. These dogs might be small, but they definitely have a lot of personality!

The Boston Yorkie is a relatively rare and recent designer dog breed. Their parents are two purebred dogs, the Yorkshire Terrier and the Boston Terrier. Needless to say, as these are two very different dog breeds, their mix will widely vary in looks. The fact that designer dogs are unpredictable in appearance holds especially true for the Boston Yorkie. These hybrids will range from short hair to long hair and come in a variety of colors. Each Boston Yorkie puppy will be unique-looking and many people find that to be a part of their appeal!

As a versatile, amiable dog, the Boston Yorkie can fit in many households. As long as they get proper training and socialization on time, they are friendly, loving and easy-going. However, not every family will be ideal for this designer dog breed. Read on to find out if the Boston Yorkie is the best choice for your lifestyle and family!

The Boston Yorkie is an affectionate, sweet dog with a fun-loving attitude.

The parents of Boston Yorkie are two purebred dogs, the Yorkshire Terrier and the Boston Terrier.There’s not much we know about the origin of the individual designer dog breeds. The trend of crossbreeding purebred dogs has been going on since the late 1980s, but a lot of the information is missing. For instance, more popular and earlier mixes such as the Labradoodle or the Bernedoodle have a well-documented history, whereas some of the rarer mixes, such as the Boston Yorkie, have a mysterious past.

There were no breeders that claimed that they were the one to first intentionally create the Boston Terrier and Yorkshire Terrier mix, so we can’t pinpoint their exact origin. To boot, there probably have been many accidental litters of these two purebred dogs throughout history, making it impossible to realize when people started actually breeding them intentionally. Best guess anyone can have is that the Boston Yorkie shares his story with other designer dogs and that it had its start in the last 20 years.

Regardless of his short and enigmatic history, though, the Boston Yorkie himself is not a dog with mysterious lineage. His parentage is quite clear and the long and impressive histories of both the lovely “American Gentleman” and elegant Yorkie speak volumes about the breed’s qualities.

The Boston Yorkie is a designer dog breed with two purebred parents: the Boston Terrier and the Yorkshire Terrier. These are first generation or F1 mix dogs, which means that they have 50 percent of the genes of each breed. The mother of the Boston Yorkie litters is usually the Boston Terrier, as they tend to be bigger, and the father is the Yorkie.

The mixed breed offspring they produce will vary in looks and behavior. Having in mind how very different the parental breeds are, you can expect some significant differences across one litter, let alone the whole breed. Some Boston Yorkies can have a flat face and the iconic black and white coat. Others can sport gold and blue locks and a cute foxy face. In the majority of instances, though, you can expect these dogs to inherit a little something from both mom and dad. These are truly unusual and unique-looking dogs!

Multigenerational crossings are not common for the Boston Yorkie, because it’s still a new breed. Further crossbreeding with non-related Boston Terriers and Yorkshire Terriers will lead to a more uniform appearance. But, as these are currently mixed breed dogs, they are not eligible for registration with major canine clubs. As a result, Boston Yorkie puppies don’t have official pedigree papers. Nevertheless, if you’re buying a puppy from a reputable breeder, you should get a health guarantee.

Knowing which type of food is the best for your dog will save you a lot of trouble down the road. A well-balanced, healthy diet will be one of the more important factors for your pet’s health, as it ensures their basic needs are met and supports their overall health. Luckily, the Boston Yorkie is not too demanding when it comes to their grubs. Like most dogs, these adorable little hybrids will also do best on dry food. However, not all dry foods will do the job.

Choose kibble that contains only high-quality, natural ingredients. Meat-based protein should be the most represented in the formula, followed by healthy fats, and complex carbs. Avoid cheap kibble that’s full of fillers and artificial ingredients, as it can do more damage than good in the long run. Ideally, you’d choose premium kibble that’s formulated to meet Boston Yorkie’s individual needs, such as age (puppy, adult, senior), size and activity level. Usually, small breed formula is a great match for these hybrids.

Another important thing is to make sure you’re not pouring too much kibble in your pet’s bowl. Follow the recommendations and don’t overindulge your precious pet. Similarly, kibble toppers such as wet food or cooked doggie meals can lead to a weight gain if offered too often.

Boston Yorkies are intelligent, curious dogs that love to explore the world around them- even if it often gets them in trouble.

The Boston Yorkie is a smart dog that’s eager to please. Needless to say, this designer dog is very trainable and beginner-friendly breed. However, you shouldn’t forget that this hybrid comes from dogs with terrier and bulldog lineage; both of which are known to be willful. Sometimes, the Boston Yorkie can also have a stubborn streak, but with a bit of patience and effort, it shouldn’t make the training any more difficult. The key, though, is knowing how to approach the training sessions. You should be consistent but also keep things short and interesting. The best method is to use treats and rewards as motivation- positive reinforcement has the best results.   

Sometimes, the Boston Yorkie can be hard to housebreak. Make sure to start potty training early and be persistent with your sessions. Additionally, timely socialization is as important as training. Having your pet meet other animals, people outside of the family and play with children could significantly influence their personality in the adult stage of their life- for the better!

While both the Yorkshire Terrier and Boston Terrier are small dogs, there is quite a difference in their maximum weight. For that reason, Boston Yorkie will be quite unpredictable in terms of his size- these dogs can weigh anywhere between 10 and 25 pounds.

The parents of Boston Yorkie are two purebred dogs, the Yorkshire Terrier and the Boston Terrier.The Boston Yorkie is the descendant of two breeds made to be perfect companions. It doesn’t come as a surprise to learn that he turned out to be a fabulous furry friend, as well! Lively, sweet, and smart, these hybrids possess many qualities that make them ideal pets. They are people-oriented and cuddly, and will often be velcro dogs, following you around and trying to be a part of everything you do. Even so, they won’t be docile lap dogs or laid-back couch potatoes.

Boston Yorkies are intelligent, curious dogs that love to explore the world around them- even if it often gets them in trouble. They are energetic and will thrive with an owner that cherishes their inquisitive nature.

If trained and socialized on time, the Boston Yorkie will get along with other pets and children. However, owing to their size, they are a better fit for families with older children. They can easily be injured during rough play or nip if provoked, so young kids are not the best match.

The concept of hybrid vigor, which implies that the crossbreed offspring displays improved health and resilience than its parents, has been falsely attributed to canine hybrids. While they share the name, designer dogs are not hybrids in the true sense of the world, as they belong to the same species- only different breeds. This means that your Boston Yorkie won’t inherently be healthier than his parental breeds. They will still be at risk for the same issues that affect the Boston Terrier and the Yorkie, albeit sometimes in a smaller percentage.

The common health problems that Boston Yorkie could have include Cushing’s disease, heart issues (mitral valve disease or patent ductus arteriosus), eye issues, or reverse sneezing. As they are a small breed dog, they will also be prone to luxating patellas, diabetes, and early tooth loss.

The life expectancy for a Boston Yorkie is between 12 and 15 years.

The Boston Yorkie is a lively pooch with a lot of spirit, but they’re not high-maintenance when it comes to their activity needs. They will need daily exercise, but much less of it than you’d have to provide to a large, athletic breed. As a rule of thumb, the Boston Terrier and Yorkie mix will need 30 to 45 minutes of daily activity. Take them on brisk walks, for a game of zoomies and friendly playtime at the local dog park, or play a game of fetch in a fenced backyard. As long as they get to spend their energy in a fun and healthy way, the Boston Yorkie will be more than happy. Having in mind that these dogs don’t need that much outdoors time, it’s no wonder that they’re such a popular choice for people who live in an apartment and seniors!

The Boston Yorkie is a lively pooch with a lot of spirit, but they’re not high-maintenance when it comes to their activity needs.

The American Kennel Club, same as any other major canine organization, doesn’t recognize designer dog breeds. However, the Boston Yorkie is recognized by a few smaller clubs, including the American Canine Hybrid Club and Dog Registry of America.

The coat of the Boston Yorkie will widely vary from dog to dog. This is a common occurrence with designer dog breeds, but even more so when the parental breed are so different in appearance. After all, the Boston Terrier does sport a short, low-maintenance coat whereas the Yorkie prides himself on long, lustrous locks of silky hair.

The crossbreed offspring can favor one of them in terms of the coat type, or end up somewhere in between the two. This is the most common option, where the Boston Yorkie has a medium long, often shaggy coat, that sheds moderately.

Similarly, his coat won’t be high-maintenance. Grooming these dogs is easy and undemanding, as they need brushing a few times a week. In addition to their regular “beauty routine”, that is!

Boston Yorkie puppies will have different looks but the same spirit. Especially in their puppyhood, these dogs will be energetic, curious and cuddly! Of course, the fact that they’ll disarm you with their cuteness doesn’t mean you should neglect their training. Training and socialization should start as early as possible. This will help your puppy fulfill his or her potential to be a perfect companion.

Photo credit: SikorskiFotografie/Shutterstock; Alexander Kliuiko/Shutterstock


Comparable Breeds

Go to Boston Terrier

Boston Terrier

  • Height: 15-17 inches
  • Weight: 10-25 lb
  • Lifespan: 13-15 years
  • Group: AKC Non-Sporting
  • Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
  • Temperament: Friendly, lively, entertaining, intelligent
  • Comparable Breeds: Boxer, Pug
Go to Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire Terrier

  • Height: 6-8 inches
  • Weight: 6-7 lb
  • Lifespan: 12-15 years
  • Group: AKC Toy
  • Best Suited For: Families with older children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
  • Temperament: Feisty, stubborn, cuddly, inquisitive
  • Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Pomeranian