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March 30, 2016 PetGuide
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Muggin

 
  • Height: 10-14 inches
  • Weight: 12-22 lb
  • Lifespan: 12-15 years
  • Group: Not applicable
  • Best Suited For: Singles, couples, families living in a house or apartment
  • Temperament: Affectionate, loyal, playful, stubborn
  • Comparable Breeds: Miniature Pinscher, Pug

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These adorable little furballs will light up your life with their enthusiastic outlook on life and playful nature. Depending on how much they take from each parent, the Muggin may take the short snout and curly tail of the Pug or the longer snout and shorter tail of the Miniature Pinscher but in every case, you’re guaranteed the living, breathing definition of cute!

These dogs tend to bond closely with their favorite human and never leave their side. They require all of your love, affection and attention, which means they aren’t the best dogs to leave at home for too many hours a day. Although small, the Muggin requires lots of indoor and outdoor play to burn up all that energy inside of them. Also important to note is that they carry a characteristic that is sometimes unfavorable for those who live in apartments: they are frequent barkers. But that shouldn’t deter you from considering this pooch as the perfect addition to the family, as they deal wonderfully with kids and other dogs alike.

Muggins tend to regularly shed, especially during Spring and Winter, so be sure to vacuum your home and brush their coat regularly.

This act of breeding two pure-bred dogs to make a Designer breed has grown in popularity because of the belief of hybrid vigor. Pugs are an old Chinese breed of companion dogs that have made their way to Europe when the Chinese traded the dogs for Dutch goods and the Dutch came to Europe. Pugs eventually came into the U.S. after the Civil War.

The origin  of the Miniature Pinscher breed, on the other hand, is mostly unknown and can only be traced back a few hundred years in Germany. There, they were bred to keep homes and stables vermin-free. Previously called the Reh Pinscher came to the U.S. in 1919 and was officially renamed the Miniature Pinscher in 1972.

A mix of Pug and Miniature Pinscher, the Muggin is an adorable little furball.The Muggin is a cross between a Pug and Miniature Pinscher. They have also been called Pin Pugs (although we’re not sure which name is cuter), although the original name of a Pug and a Miniature Pig was called a Carlin Pinscher.

This designer breed does have a higher than normal risk of gaining weight due to overeating, so be sure to measure the exact amount of food given on a daily basis, and separate it between 2-3 meals. One to one and a half cups of good quality dry kibble should be enough.

The Muggins dog is a loving, affectionate breed who wants nothing more than to curl up beside you with a good movie to relax with their favorite human family.

Training this little bundle of joy may be easier said than done. The Muggin is not an easy dog to train and it is for that reason that we don’t recommend this designer breed for first-time pet parents. To train this dog, one must be patient, firm and always reward good behavior with treats. Always remember to keep your tone of voice light and positive, as dogs can tell when you’re mad or irritated at them and will be less inclined to perform the trick you so desperately want to teach them.

The Muggin is a relatively small dog that can weight anywhere between 12 to 22 pounds.

A mix of Pug and Miniature Pinscher, the Muggin is an adorable little furball.The Muggins dog is a loving, affectionate breed who wants nothing more than to curl up beside you with a good movie to relax with their favorite human family. S/he may bark a few times when a strange noise is heard or a guest walks through the door, but they’re incredibly sweet once they understand that no danger is present. Everyone who walks through the door is a stranger one second and their best friend the next, so long as head-scratches and belly rubs are in order. They’ll lick you to death if you allow them!

If you intend to bring home a Muggin, understand that they do have a sliver of separation anxiety. They love their human family so much that they do become stressed out when you leave for work for the day because in their mind, you’re never going to come back home.  Having another dog around will definitely ease that worry and keep them busy until you come home. They are also great with kids, so long as they are not handled too roughly, else they have a tendency to nip

Muggins can take on any health problems that present within their parent breeds, which are the Pug and Miniature Pinschers. This includes nerve degeneration, epilepsy, eye problems, mange, staph, patellar luxation, Legg Perthes, vaccination sensitivity, hypothyroidism, skin problems, allergies, yeast infection and hip dysplasia. They can also develop MyoTonia Congenite, Von Willebrand’s, congenital magaesophagus, liver problems, collapsed trachea and hypoglycemia.  Always buy your dogs from a reputable breeder who can show you a clean bill of health before you purchase a puppy.

The Muggin has an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years.

When it comes to going outside for a run, the Muggin is a bit more active than the Pug, who is known for its inactivity and inability to deal with temperatures that are too hot or two cold. Most Muggins seem to take from their Miniature Pinscher sides and enjoy going on regular walks. If they seem to be acting out or doing things they don’t normally do (like biting your shoes), it may be because they are bored and need more daily activity to get rid of that extra energy. This could mean anything from adding a midday walk to having some more indoor playtime. Remember, every dog’s energy level is different, so understand your dog’s limits and don’t push them.

To train this dog, one must be patient, firm and always reward good behavior with treats.

The Muggin is not recognized by the American Kennel Club, as it is considered to be a hybrid breed. However, this breed is recognized by the American Canine Hybrid Club (ACHC), the Designer Dogs Kennel Club (DDKC), Dog Registry of America, Inc. (DRA), International Designer Canine Registry (IDCR) and Designer Breed Registry (DBR).

Muggins can come in a variety of different colors including cream, black, brown, golden, white and everything in between. It is also not unlikely for Muggins to have a combination of colors, such as black and tan. Their coat is short and fine, but is not hypoallergenic by any means. They tend to regularly shed, especially during Spring and Winter, so be sure to vacuum your home and brush their coat regularly. A bath every once in a while is warranted, or you could wipe them down with a damp cloth to get some stray fur off.

Puppy Muggins can cost anywhere between $250-$750, depending on supply, their age and the breeder. These dogs tend to do well with kids and other dogs when they are socialized at an early age. Once they are about six weeks old, make sure to have a Muggin around young children and other dogs, always with close supervision to make sure it doesn’t get hurt.

Photo credit: Nicole.Kelly/Flickr; Mary Rotman/Flickr


Comparable Breeds

Go to Miniature Pinscher

Miniature Pinscher

  • Height: 10-13 inches
  • Weight: 8-10 lb
  • Lifespan: 14-17 years
  • Group: AKC Toy
  • Best Suited For: Singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
  • Temperament: High energy, bold, stubborn, independent
  • Comparable Breeds: Cairn Terrier, Chihuahua
Go to Pug

Pug

  • Height: 10-14 inches
  • Weight: 14-18 lb
  • Lifespan: 12-14 years
  • Group: AKC Toy
  • Best Suited For: Families with children, singles, seniors, apartments, houses with/without yards
  • Temperament: Playful, comical, perky, friendly
  • Comparable Breeds: French Bulldog, Pekingese