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What is Pet Selection Counseling?

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Bringing home a new pet is always an exciting time, but it definitely isn’t a decision to make likely. If you’re thinking about getting a new dog, consider whether you’re able to commit to caring for your new friend for the duration of his life – it could be fifteen years or more! You also need to think about your living situation, how much free time you have, and what kind of qualities you want in a pet. It can sometimes be difficult to work through these things all on your own so, if you’re considering getting a new pet, think about pet selection counseling. Keep reading to learn more.

The Importance of Pet Selection Counseling

Nothing is more adorable than a wriggly little puppy. You must know, however, that the little puppy is going to grow up and he isn’t always going to be quite so cuddly! Dogs come with a significant degree of responsibility and becoming dog owner is a major commitment of time and finances.

Related: Pros and Cons of Adopting a Puppy

Unless you’re completely sure that you are ready to take on dog ownership, you may want to think about a more low-maintenance pet. How do you know whether a dog is the right pet for you and, if it is, which breed is the best choice? Pet selection counseling! This service exists to help potential pet parents like you think about all of the choices involved in selecting a pet to ensure that you make the choice that is best for you and for your new furry friend.

What Does Pet Selection Counseling Involve?

Pet selection counseling is a service offered by some veterinarians and veterinary clinics – it may also be available at your local shelter or animal rescue. The goal of this service is to really think through all of the details that go into caring for a new pet and to determine two things: whether you are able to provide for a new pet and, if so, what kind of pet is the best choice.

Related: Top 5 Books For New Puppy Owners

To give you a better idea what pet selection counseling looks like, here are some of the things your counselor might ask you to consider if you’re thinking about getting a dog:

  1. The financial impact of owning a dog.
  2. The time required to train and care for a dog.
  3. The ways in which a dog might affect your household dynamics.
  4. The long-term implications of getting a dog.

When it comes to owning a dog, the costs extend far beyond the cost of your puppy – you also have to think about a dog crate, a bed, monthly costs for food, regular veterinary services, and costs for grooming and training. In terms of the time commitment, a dog is not a low-maintenance pet – they require daily walks as well as plenty of human interaction. Getting a dog will change your family dynamic as well – you may need to change your plans to accommodate your dog. Finally, getting a dog is a commitment you need to be able to honor for the entire life of the dog which could be 15 years or more!

Even if you already own a pet (or two, or three), it is always a good idea to think through the decision to add another member to your family. If you’re considering getting another pet, do a little research to see whether pet selection counseling is available in your area. It never hurts to be as thoroughly prepared as possible, and that is exactly what this service exists to do – prepare you to be the best pet owner you can be.


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