Top 10 Best Poop Bags

PetGuide
PetGuide logo

Having to pick up your dog’s poop is definitely not one of the upsides of pet parenting –  but it’s a must, nevertheless. Not only is it bad manners to leave your doggy’s doo doo lying on the sidewalk, but it’s also bad for the environment, people and other animals. Since having a dog and scooping up poop go hand in hand, it’s important to get the best supplies for this dirty business. No pawrent worth his or her salt goes on a walk without a few poop bags in their pocket.

There are many joys and perks of being a pet parent, and handling your dog’s poop is definitely not on that list. However, just because no one likes doing it doesn’t mean it will go away, so the next best thing you can do is to make your life easier and minimize the hassle (and the nastiness) that come with the dreaded chore. There are many reasons why picking up dog poop is your responsibility as a dog owner, and neglecting it can have devastating consequences for the ecosystem – not to mention that it’s just plain rude leaving your dog’s poop around for someone to step in. Luckily, with the constant innovations and a vast selection of products on the pet market, cleaning up after your pet doesn’t have to be a hassle. You can even pick up poop hands-free with pooper scoopers, both at home and on walks. However, most pet parents agree that the most convenient way of handling their dog’s waste is to use dog poop bags. Compact enough to fit in your pocket or hang from the leash, they are always on hand, inexpensive and designed with practicality in mind.

Naturally, not all dog poop bags are up to standards. Sometimes, going for the cheapest option will cost you in the long run. Just imagine what could happen if that super thin, flimsy baggie ripped while you were picking up the poop… Ugh. What if it were too small to comfortably pick up your pet’s number two without making a mess? It hurts just to think about it. That’s why it’s so important to find dog poop bags that work for you. You want something that fits your budget, your pet’s habits, and any other preference you might have, such as eco-friendliness or compatibility with the type of dog leash you use. Despite what many may think, picking out dog poop bags requires some thought and research, and it might not be as easy to find what you want on the first try.

To help you make dog waste disposal a mess-free, stress-free chore, we’ve rounded up tried-and-tested dog poop bags that have raving reviews from other pawrents. From biodegradable poop bags to extra large poop bags to those that are scented to conceal the smells, you’ll find a perfect match for your needs on our list. If you’re unsure what makes a good poop bag in the first place or need some tips on picking up poop, keep reading! Our buying guide has all the info you’ll need to decide which waste bags are the right choice for you and your crappy companion.

Here’s our list of the top 10 best poop bags to bring with you on your walk:

Top 10 Best Poop Bags: My AlphaPet Dog Poop Bags

If you’re looking to reduce your pooch’s carbon paw print, these 100% biodegradable poop bags are fully made from cornstarch (that’s made from GM free corn) and top our list for the best poop bags you can buy. One of these bad boys will break down and decompose completely in just 90 days! The clever design ensures durability and robustness, while the star-sealed base adds thickness and keeps the poop exactly where it should be. The 20 micron bags are on a cardboard roll, and fit most standard dispensers. While also large enough to take care of all kinds of messes, what more can you really ask for in a poop bag? These green poop bags are scent-free, but My AlphaPet also produces rose-scented bags in pink and red.

Check Price


frisco-pantry-pack-dog-poop-bag

If your four-legged family member likes to drop the smellies directly in your backyard, or you simply want to grab a bag on the go for your daily walks, these Frisco baggies could be the most convenient option for you. Packaged in a box with a roll dispenser, these large leak-proof bags are easy to tear off and put in your pocket for those impromptu doodies. While not biodegradable, these were made using EPI technology and designed to break down faster than regular waste bags. You can choose between the unscented version and the watermelon-scented alternative that will definitely mask unpleasant smells. For 300 bags in one box, this is by far the best value of our top 10 picks.

Check Price


bags-on-board-bag-rainbow

What’s one of the things that could make cleaning up poop a bit less dreadful? Doing it with vibrant baggies in all the colors of the rainbow! Each pack contains strong, large bags in 5 colors: yellow, orange, pink, purple and blue. The double-sealed construction makes them leakproof, as well as the strong plastic material they’re made of. These are slightly larger bags and the dimensions are 9 by 14 inches, but the rolls are a perfect fit for Bags on Board dispensers. The bigger size ensures that your dog’s more impressive number twos fit in the bag and still leave enough room for you to tie it before tossing in the trash. With a price tag under $10 for 140 poop bags, they’re an absolute steal!

Check Price


Top 10 Best Poop Bags: Pogi's Poop Bags with Easy-Tie Handles

Some people find the whole baggy business fiddly, and tying it up is usually the main culprit. Holding your dog’s steaming doodie through a bag is stressful enough, and know you need to maneuver a knot?! It can definitely get messy real fast. Luckily for us, there are poop bags that come with handles for an effortless tie before the trash toss. Pogi’s poop bags with handles don’t come in a roll, but rather in a convenient cardboard box, so you can just tear off a few to keep on hand when it’s time for walks. The extra large capacity (dimensions are 7 by 14.5 inches) make these suitable for even the largest dog breeds. These EPI technology bags are also fresh powder scented for your nose’s convenience, but there’s a fragrance-free alternative, too.  

Check Price


UNNI-100%-compostable-pet-poop-bags

The eco-conscious pet parent will love these 100% compostable bags, as the manufacturer turned to plant starch rather than plastic for the production. These bags are not just green when it comes to their color! The high biobased content of UNNI poop bags means they contain no polyethylene and were made solely from the starch of plants. For that reason, they’ve been certified in both the United States and Europe. Experts agree that these can be used in a backyard compost setting as they will decompose, but it’s best to avoid tossing your pet’s droppings in the compost bin if it’s near your living space (I’m talking to you, condo composters).

Check Price


Doodie Flush Dog Poop Bags are premium quality bags that feel sturdy and thick, but still are biodegradable and dissolve in just a bit of water. In fact, they’re so biodegradable, you can toss them, compost them or flush them, all in the name of keeping Mother Nature happy. Poop scooping with eco-friendly bags can definitely be unpleasant because they’re so thin (that’s what they need to be for dissolving as they degrade). Doodie Flush Dog Poop Bags really are made to flush. In fact, they’re also made to meet ASTMd6400 standards, which is a pretty impressive certification in the industry.

While these baggies are on the more pricey end, a great bonus is that they’re engineered to break down when in contact with water, so flushing them is easy as they’re also septic-safe.

Check Price


earth-rated-poop-bags-refill-pack

Available in lavender scented or unscented, these affordable and reliable poop bags have been a bestseller for years, and with good reason! The tough and big bags are easy to use and handle any type of poop you might come across. The 100 percent leak-proof bag measures 9 by 13 inches, so there’s no need to worry about coming in contact with the waste – you can comfortably roll these bad boys all the way up to your elbows. Also, the bags are made of a material that contains an EPI additive to speed up the decomposition of the bags- but the company also offers a vegetable-based alternative if you want poop bags that are really certified as biodegradable.

Check Price


bark-dog-waste-poop-bags

Got 99 problems but a bag ain’t one – what better way to sum up what these poop bags are about? In addition to being oxo-biodegradable and made with EPI technology, these large, robust waste disposal bags come with a witty, humorous message printed out. Why not add some pizzazz to the poop scooping? There are two available themes – Pug Life for the gangsta canine and the Poopaganda for the pooch who’s not afraid to get political about his crap. Some of the messages these unique poop bags feature include nuggets of gold such as ‘Make Logs, Not War!’ ‘Do Your Civic Doody’, and ‘Poop There It Is!’.

Check Price


Top 10 Best Poop Bags: Parisian Pet Dog Poop Bags for Dogs

Ah, the word Parisian in the mix almost makes picking up poop sound glamorous and refined. Of course, it’s all but that. However, these stylish and fun poop bags could make cleaning your pet’s drab dung look a bit less dull. The bags come in 10 different designs, including favorites such as red with bone print, blue paw print, and pink polka dots. Each package comes with 16 separate rolls that fit most containers, with 320 unscented bags in total. At less than $15 per pack, it’s quite a bargain, especially considering the unique design. The dimensions of the bags are 9 by 13 inches, and the leak-proof material holds up really well, despite what the patterned, colorful design might indicate.

Check Price


Top 10 Best Poop Bags: Pogi’s Poop Bags

Easy to tear from the roll, leak-proof, and budget-friendly is what poop-scooper’s dreams are made of. The Pogi’s poop bags, this time in the standard roll version, are a tried and true option. The earth-friendly bags contain EPI, which makes the bag decompose at a faster rate than standard polyurethane. Suitable for dogs of all sizes and pooping capacities, these bags are 9 inches by 13.5 inches in dimensions, so there’s plenty of room to store the doodie and tie the knot. Another convenient feature of these classic poop bags is that they have a clearly marked opening side that makes bags easy to tear from the roll. No need to juggle the leash and your dog to get to a bag without ripping it in the process, as it detaches smoothly and effortlessly.

Check Price

There’s no getting around it – as a dog owner, you have the responsibility to pick up after your pet. It’s not just that neglecting to pick up your pet’s poop is bad manners, but it can be dangerous as well. There are many misconceptions about dog feces, and most of them fail to acknowledge the hazard your pet’s waste can pose. It’s not just that dog poop is a nasty, smelly surprise an unassuming passerby can step in. It’s even officially categorized as an environmental pollutant by the EPA! Here are the dangers that come with leaving your pet’s waste on the street, lawn, or anywhere that’s not a bin:

  • Parasites

Dog feces can be a source of parasites for other dogs and humans alike – worm species such as roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms or protozoan parasites such as giardia and coccidia. Needless to say, all of these parasites can seriously endanger other pets on the same route if the feces aren’t properly disposed of but rather left lying around. Humans can be at risk, too, especially vulnerable groups such as pregnant women, children, and the elderly.

  • Infection

Studies indicate that just one gram of dog feces contains about 23 million fecal bacteria – that’s A LOT in case you didn’t already figure it out. Among those millions, poop can contain bacteria that cause serious diseases and infections, both among humans and animals, including escherichia coli, salmonella, and campylobacteriosis. All of these are notoriously difficult to treat and extremely easy to contract, especially through contact with infected feces. Of course, let’s not forget the many viral infections that can be contracted through poop: parvovirus and canine coronavirus are some of the many that lurk in feces and can infect other pets.

  • Pollution

In 1991, EPA put dog poop in the category of environmental pollutants. To put things into perspective, that’s the same group that pesticides, antifreeze, or oil spills fall into. Needless to say, this means that if dog poop was to get into our waterways, it could cause serious contamination. It will get into a waterway if you leave it behind – when it rains or snows, the contaminants from dog feces will get into the storm drainage system and find its way to streams and lakes. From there, it’s all downhill. All those problematic parasites, bacteria, and diseases will also enter the water stream and can make the water in your area completely unusable and even hazardous.

  • Affecting the ecosystem

Once the contaminants from dog feces enter the waterways, it’s not “just” disease and bacteria that are making a mess. There are certain nutrients in dog poop that feed algae and weeds, causing their overgrowth. This will make our waters murky and green while disrupting the natural balance of the ecosystem. Similarly, when it comes to grass and plants, dog poop isn’t a good fertilizer as the nutrients it contains don’t match the needs of the plant life. Unlike cow manure for example, dog poop is rich in proteins, and once they start breaking down with the decomposing of the feces, they’ll make the soil more acidic which will ruin most flower beds and lawns. Not to mention that it’s not a smart idea to use bacteria-ridden dog poop as a fertilizer in the first place – even if it did work.

Dog poop bags vary in design in quality and you’ll have to consider different factors before settling on a specific brand:

  • Durability

It goes without saying: you don’t want your baggie to rip while you’re in the process of disposing of the poop – ew! Leaky dog poop bags or those that are too thin and rip easily are those that you should avoid at all costs. Go for those made from thicker materials and spacious enough to comfortably hold its contents.

  • Dimensions

If you’re wondering what size poop bags you need, the bigger the better. You want to grab the poop with the bag while making minimal contact with the poop itself (even through the bag) and if the bag is too compact to hold the poop, you’ll be in a world of trouble. Larger bags prepare you for all kinds of situations and allow easier access to poop without requiring closer contact. They’re much easier to securely close, regardless of the volume of their contents. Even if your pet is not a large breed dog, you can’t go wrong by opting for bigger poop bags.

  • Odor control

In addition to containing the fecal matter itself, ideal dog poop bags should also contain and seal all unpleasant smells. Some can be successful in odor control simply by being thick enough, but you might prefer going for scented dog poop bags. These are available in a variety of odor-neutralizing scents that will mask the smell of the bag’s contents and make the process less yucky, if we’re being honest.

  • Eco-friendliness

If ecology is an important issue for you, you might be wondering what happens with all those plastic dog poop bags once you toss them in the trash. The reality is that, like with all plastic, poop bags take thousands of years to decompose. If you want to avoid contributing to the pollution problem, there are biodegradable and compostable dog poop bags. The first can be degraded in special conditions (but there’s much controversy about their toxicity to the environment) and others can be safely used in compost (but again, the compost contaminated with dog feces can’t be used as a fertilizer).

Now you know that you should always pick up your dog’s poop, you might be wondering what’s the proper way of disposing of it? Once you get the poop in the baggie, you should securely close it and toss it inside the trash bin. The alternative is flushing your pet’s poop (if he does his business at home) as the toilet water goes straight to a sewage treatment plant so there’s no risk of contamination. You shouldn’t compost your pet’s poop for the same reasons you shouldn’t use it as a fertilizer, so, sadly, that’s not an option.

We are committed to finding, researching, and recommending the best products. We earn commissions from purchases you make using the retail links in our product reviews. Learn more about how this works.