Study: Pup Parents Plaster Social Media With Dog Pics

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People love their pets. Really love their pets. This shows in the exponential increases in pet product sales and offerings in the last few years. As part of a second study done late last year by BarkBox, new research shows that dog owners are peppering their social media accounts with pictures of their dogs, and creating more and more social media pages dedicated solely to their pups.



Last year’s study showed that pet parents were happier and healthier on average when compared to surveyed non-pet parents. The results of this second part focused on how dog parents behave on social media when it comes to posts and information sharing about their pets.

Related: Study: Dogs Respond to Baby Talk

Cementing the belief that Americans are dog-obsessed (and, um, why wouldn’t we be???), the BarkBox study found that on average, dog owners use social media accounts to post a picture or talk about their dog about six times a week–essentially an average of about a post a day is somehow related to their dog.

More, the study found that on average, dog parents watch a dog video or look at dog pictures at least three times a week in various social media formats. Add to that finding that one in ten pet-people (of 1006) surveyed even created and maintain a unique social media account solely for their dog, and it seems that America is goo-goo for it’s dogs!

When looking more specifically at the pictures taken by pooch-parents of their dogs, the study found that 20% of the pictures on cellular phones are of their dogs–which is higher than the percentage of pictures of trips or vacations (15%) or selfies of themselves (15%) also found on their phones. Additionally more than 42% of dog people polled use a photo of their dog as their screensaver/wall photo on their mobile devices or computer desktops.

Related: Study: Millennials Make Up a Quarter of all Pet Owners

The study also found that Millennials had a tendency to use technology like webcams to keep an eye on and get ‘fixes’ of their pups when not together, over non-Millennials (24% vs 13%). Millennials are actually nearly three times as likely to Skype or Facetime their dogs (23% vs. 8%) than their older counterparts, indicating that a younger generation more familiar with current technology makes the most of ways to keep in contact with their dogs even when physically separated. Being separated from one’s dog is often a reality due to the regular obligations of life, and so to ease the concern when apart, over 30% of pet parents say they have a security camera (or cameras) for their residences that they mostly use as a way to keep an eye on their dog.

So, go ahead…post pictures of Fido chewing on his favorite bone in the middle of the day for everyone to ooohhh and ahhhh over! You’ll be in great company!